the background, or everything that is “behind” the foreground element

Each photographer, therefore you too, has the ability to define which elements are more important than others by playing with the management of the plans in the composition of the image. After all, it is normal to hear the quote “being overshadowed” to indicate a loss of importance, on the contrary you have often heard “give it a close up” (especially in cinema) to indicate that a subject must be “exalted” and made more important.

You photographer can manage this thing thanks to the depth of field, or deciding which elements must be “sharp” and which “blurry” for example.

If they asked me what the essential ingredient for photography is, I’m sure the answer could only be one: light. It doesn’t matter what equipment, how many lenses you have or what quality they are, much less the maximum aperture of the diaphragm. At the basis of everything, however, there must be an understanding of light. Knowing that you need light to take pictures is nothing overwhelming or innovative, it is a well-known thing. If you are a photographer who wants to become aware of what he does, then the first thing you need to do when you enter an environment that you have to photograph is to evaluate the intensity of the light.

A classic example is to photograph a person or element making sure that it is perfectly sharp, while the background (or elements in front) completely blurred. By playing with the aperture and focal lengths, you can decide what to make appear “sharp” and what “blurry”.

This is a basic and simple technique to put the sharp subject in the “foreground” while the background will be totally uniform and devoid of distinguishable elements (and which can distract the observer).

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If they asked me what the essential ingredient for photography is, I’m sure the answer could only be one: light. It doesn’t matter what equipment, how many lenses you have or what quality they are, much less the maximum aperture of the diaphragm


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In the same way, however, you can also decide to give importance to “many” elements of the frame (such as a group of people or a musical group), for this reason you could make sure to obtain a wide depth of field so that all elements are clear and contextualized, so that there is not one that prevails over the others. Obviously, in this last case you have to work differently, in composition, to get the message across to the observer without risking getting lost in a photo that doesn’t convey anything.

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